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"Recommendation": models, code, and papers
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Modeling Sequential Recommendation as Missing Information Imputation

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Jan 04, 2023
Yujie Lin, Zhumin Chen, Zhaochun Ren, Chenyang Wang, Qiang Yan, Maarten de Rijke, Xiuzhen Cheng, Pengjie Ren

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Side information is being used extensively to improve the effectiveness of sequential recommendation models. It is said to help capture the transition patterns among items. Most previous work on sequential recommendation that uses side information models item IDs and side information separately. This can only model part of relations between items and their side information. Moreover, in real-world systems, not all values of item feature fields are available. This hurts the performance of models that rely on side information. Existing methods tend to neglect the context of missing item feature fields, and fill them with generic or special values, e.g., unknown, which might lead to sub-optimal performance. To address the limitation of sequential recommenders with side information, we define a way to fuse side information and alleviate the problem of missing side information by proposing a unified task, namely the missing information imputation (MII), which randomly masks some feature fields in a given sequence of items, including item IDs, and then forces a predictive model to recover them. By considering the next item as a missing feature field, sequential recommendation can be formulated as a special case of MII. We propose a sequential recommendation model, called missing information imputation recommender (MIIR), that builds on the idea of MII and simultaneously imputes missing item feature values and predicts the next item. We devise a dense fusion self-attention (DFSA) for MIIR to capture all pairwise relations between items and their side information. Empirical studies on three benchmark datasets demonstrate that MIIR, supervised by MII, achieves a significantly better sequential recommendation performance than state-of-the-art baselines.

* Under progress 

A Survey of Diversification Techniques in Search and Recommendation

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Jan 02, 2023
Haolun Wu, Yansen Zhang, Chen Ma, Fuyuan Lyu, Fernando Diaz, Xue Liu

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Diversifying search results is an important research topic in retrieval systems in order to satisfy both the various interests of customers and the equal market exposure of providers. There has been a growing attention on diversity-aware research during recent years, accompanied by a proliferation of literature on methods to promote diversity in search and recommendation. However, the diversity-aware studies in retrieval systems lack a systematic organization and are rather fragmented. In this survey, we are the first to propose a unified taxonomy for classifying the metrics and approaches of diversification in both search and recommendation, which are two of the most extensively researched fields of retrieval systems. We begin the survey with a brief discussion of why diversity is important in retrieval systems, followed by a summary of the various diversity concerns in search and recommendation, highlighting their relationship and differences. For the survey's main body, we present a unified taxonomy of diversification metrics and approaches in retrieval systems, from both the search and recommendation perspectives. In the later part of the survey, we discuss the openness research questions of diversity-aware research in search and recommendation in an effort to inspire future innovations and encourage the implementation of diversity in real-world systems.

Time-aware Hyperbolic Graph Attention Network for Session-based Recommendation

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Jan 10, 2023
Xiaohan Li, Yuqing Liu, Zheng Liu, Philip S. Yu

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Session-based Recommendation (SBR) is to predict users' next interested items based on their previous browsing sessions. Existing methods model sessions as graphs or sequences to estimate user interests based on their interacted items to make recommendations. In recent years, graph-based methods have achieved outstanding performance on SBR. However, none of these methods consider temporal information, which is a crucial feature in SBR as it indicates timeliness or currency. Besides, the session graphs exhibit a hierarchical structure and are demonstrated to be suitable in hyperbolic geometry. But few papers design the models in hyperbolic spaces and this direction is still under exploration. In this paper, we propose Time-aware Hyperbolic Graph Attention Network (TA-HGAT) - a novel hyperbolic graph neural network framework to build a session-based recommendation model considering temporal information. More specifically, there are three components in TA-HGAT. First, a hyperbolic projection module transforms the item features into hyperbolic space. Second, the time-aware graph attention module models time intervals between items and the users' current interests. Third, an evolutionary loss at the end of the model provides an accurate prediction of the recommended item based on the given timestamp. TA-HGAT is built in a hyperbolic space to learn the hierarchical structure of session graphs. Experimental results show that the proposed TA-HGAT has the best performance compared to ten baseline models on two real-world datasets.

* IEEE Bigdata 2022 

A Survey on Federated Recommendation Systems

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Dec 27, 2022
Zehua Sun, Yonghui Xu, Yong Liu, Wei He, Yali Jiang, Fangzhao Wu, Lizhen Cui

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Federated learning has recently been applied to recommendation systems to protect user privacy. In federated learning settings, recommendation systems can train recommendation models only collecting the intermediate parameters instead of the real user data, which greatly enhances the user privacy. Beside, federated recommendation systems enable to collaborate with other data platforms to improve recommended model performance while meeting the regulation and privacy constraints. However, federated recommendation systems faces many new challenges such as privacy, security, heterogeneity and communication costs. While significant research has been conducted in these areas, gaps in the surveying literature still exist. In this survey, we-(1) summarize some common privacy mechanisms used in federated recommendation systems and discuss the advantages and limitations of each mechanism; (2) review some robust aggregation strategies and several novel attacks against security; (3) summarize some approaches to address heterogeneity and communication costs problems; (4)introduce some open source platforms that can be used to build federated recommendation systems; (5) present some prospective research directions in the future. This survey can guide researchers and practitioners understand the research progress in these areas.

* IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems, 2022  

Episodes Discovery Recommendation with Multi-Source Augmentations

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Jan 04, 2023
Ziwei Fan, Alice Wang, Zahra Nazari

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Recommender systems (RS) commonly retrieve potential candidate items for users from a massive number of items by modeling user interests based on historical interactions. However, historical interaction data is highly sparse, and most items are long-tail items, which limits the representation learning for item discovery. This problem is further augmented by the discovery of novel or cold-start items. For example, after a user displays interest in bitcoin financial investment shows in the podcast space, a recommender system may want to suggest, e.g., a newly released blockchain episode from a more technical show. Episode correlations help the discovery, especially when interaction data of episodes is limited. Accordingly, we build upon the classical Two-Tower model and introduce the novel Multi-Source Augmentations using a Contrastive Learning framework (MSACL) to enhance episode embedding learning by incorporating positive episodes from numerous correlated semantics. Extensive experiments on a real-world podcast recommendation dataset from a large audio streaming platform demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework for user podcast exploration and cold-start episode recommendation.

* 5 pages long for episodes discovery recommendation 

Fair Recommendation by Geometric Interpretation and Analysis of Matrix Factorization

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Jan 10, 2023
Hao Wang

Matrix factorization-based recommender system is in effect an angle preserving dimensionality reduction technique. Since the frequency of items follows power-law distribution, most vectors in the original dimension of user feature vectors and item feature vectors lie on the same hyperplane. However, it is very difficult to reconstruct the embeddings in the original dimension analytically, so we reformulate the original angle preserving dimensionality reduction problem into a distance preserving dimensionality reduction problem. We show that the geometric shape of input data of recommender system in its original higher dimension are distributed on co-centric circles with interesting properties, and design a paraboloid-based matrix factorization named ParaMat to solve the recommendation problem. In the experiment section, we compare our algorithm with 8 other algorithms and prove our new method is the most fair algorithm compared with modern day recommender systems such as ZeroMat and DotMat Hybrid.

Causal Inference for Recommendation: Foundations, Methods and Applications

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Jan 08, 2023
Shuyuan Xu, Jianchao Ji, Yunqi Li, Yingqiang Ge, Juntao Tan, Yongfeng Zhang

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Recommender systems are important and powerful tools for various personalized services. Traditionally, these systems use data mining and machine learning techniques to make recommendations based on correlations found in the data. However, relying solely on correlation without considering the underlying causal mechanism may lead to various practical issues such as fairness, explainability, robustness, bias, echo chamber and controllability problems. Therefore, researchers in related area have begun incorporating causality into recommendation systems to address these issues. In this survey, we review the existing literature on causal inference in recommender systems. We discuss the fundamental concepts of both recommender systems and causal inference as well as their relationship, and review the existing work on causal methods for different problems in recommender systems. Finally, we discuss open problems and future directions in the field of causal inference for recommendations.

FlexShard: Flexible Sharding for Industry-Scale Sequence Recommendation Models

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Jan 08, 2023
Geet Sethi, Pallab Bhattacharya, Dhruv Choudhary, Carole-Jean Wu, Christos Kozyrakis

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Sequence-based deep learning recommendation models (DLRMs) are an emerging class of DLRMs showing great improvements over their prior sum-pooling based counterparts at capturing users' long term interests. These improvements come at immense system cost however, with sequence-based DLRMs requiring substantial amounts of data to be dynamically materialized and communicated by each accelerator during a single iteration. To address this rapidly growing bottleneck, we present FlexShard, a new tiered sequence embedding table sharding algorithm which operates at a per-row granularity by exploiting the insight that not every row is equal. Through precise replication of embedding rows based on their underlying probability distribution, along with the introduction of a new sharding strategy adapted to the heterogeneous, skewed performance of real-world cluster network topologies, FlexShard is able to significantly reduce communication demand while using no additional memory compared to the prior state-of-the-art. When evaluated on production-scale sequence DLRMs, FlexShard was able to reduce overall global all-to-all communication traffic by over 85%, resulting in end-to-end training communication latency improvements of almost 6x over the prior state-of-the-art approach.

RECOMMED: A Comprehensive Pharmaceutical Recommendation System

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Dec 31, 2022
Mariam Zomorodi, Ismail Ghodsollahee, Pawel Plawiak, U. Rajendra Acharya

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A comprehensive pharmaceutical recommendation system was designed based on the patients and drugs features extracted from Drugs.com and Druglib.com. First, data from these databases were combined, and a dataset of patients and drug information was built. Secondly, the patients and drugs were clustered, and then the recommendation was performed using different ratings provided by patients, and importantly by the knowledge obtained from patients and drug specifications, and considering drug interactions. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first group to consider patients conditions and history in the proposed approach for selecting a specific medicine appropriate for that particular user. Our approach applies artificial intelligence (AI) models for the implementation. Sentiment analysis using natural language processing approaches is employed in pre-processing along with neural network-based methods and recommender system algorithms for modeling the system. In our work, patients conditions and drugs features are used for making two models based on matrix factorization. Then we used drug interaction to filter drugs with severe or mild interactions with other drugs. We developed a deep learning model for recommending drugs by using data from 2304 patients as a training set, and then we used data from 660 patients as our validation set. After that, we used knowledge from critical information about drugs and combined the outcome of the model into a knowledge-based system with the rules obtained from constraints on taking medicine.

* 42 pages, 12 figures, 13 tables 

Offline Evaluation for Reinforcement Learning-based Recommendation: A Critical Issue and Some Alternatives

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Jan 03, 2023
Romain Deffayet, Thibaut Thonet, Jean-Michel Renders, Maarten de Rijke

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In this paper, we argue that the paradigm commonly adopted for offline evaluation of sequential recommender systems is unsuitable for evaluating reinforcement learning-based recommenders. We find that most of the existing offline evaluation practices for reinforcement learning-based recommendation are based on a next-item prediction protocol, and detail three shortcomings of such an evaluation protocol. Notably, it cannot reflect the potential benefits that reinforcement learning (RL) is expected to bring while it hides critical deficiencies of certain offline RL agents. Our suggestions for alternative ways to evaluate RL-based recommender systems aim to shed light on the existing possibilities and inspire future research on reliable evaluation protocols.

* 14 pages, 1 figure