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Learning to Counterfactually Explain Recommendations

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Nov 17, 2022
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Recommender system practitioners are facing increasing pressure to explain recommendations. We explore how to explain recommendations using counterfactual logic, i.e. "Had you not interacted with the following items before, it is likely we would not recommend this item." Compared to traditional explanation logic, counterfactual explanations are easier to understand and more technically verifiable. The major challenge of generating such explanations is the computational cost because it requires repeatedly retraining the models to obtain the effect on a recommendation caused by removing user (interaction) history. We propose a learning-based framework to generate counterfactual explanations. The key idea is to train a surrogate model to learn the effect of removing a subset of user history on the recommendation. To this end, we first artificially simulate the counterfactual outcomes on the recommendation after deleting subsets of history. Then we train surrogate models to learn the mapping between a history deletion and the change in the recommendation caused by the deletion. Finally, to generate an explanation, we find the history subset predicted by the surrogate model that is most likely to remove the recommendation. Through offline experiments and online user studies, we show our method, compared to baselines, can generate explanations that are more counterfactually valid and more satisfactory considered by users.

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