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Invariant Learning via Diffusion Dreamed Distribution Shifts

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Nov 18, 2022
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Though the background is an important signal for image classification, over reliance on it can lead to incorrect predictions when spurious correlations between foreground and background are broken at test time. Training on a dataset where these correlations are unbiased would lead to more robust models. In this paper, we propose such a dataset called Diffusion Dreamed Distribution Shifts (D3S). D3S consists of synthetic images generated through StableDiffusion using text prompts and image guides obtained by pasting a sample foreground image onto a background template image. Using this scalable approach we generate 120K images of objects from all 1000 ImageNet classes in 10 diverse backgrounds. Due to the incredible photorealism of the diffusion model, our images are much closer to natural images than previous synthetic datasets. D3S contains a validation set of more than 17K images whose labels are human-verified in an MTurk study. Using the validation set, we evaluate several popular DNN image classifiers and find that the classification performance of models generally suffers on our background diverse images. Next, we leverage the foreground & background labels in D3S to learn a foreground (background) representation that is invariant to changes in background (foreground) by penalizing the mutual information between the foreground (background) features and the background (foreground) labels. Linear classifiers trained on these features to predict foreground (background) from foreground (background) have high accuracies at 82.9% (93.8%), while classifiers that predict these labels from background and foreground have a much lower accuracy of 2.4% and 45.6% respectively. This suggests that our foreground and background features are well disentangled. We further test the efficacy of these representations by training classifiers on a task with strong spurious correlations.

* 18 pages, 13 figures, 5 tables  

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