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"Topic": models, code, and papers

Comparative Opinion Mining: A Review

Dec 24, 2017
Kasturi Dewi Varathan, Anastasia Giachanou, Fabio Crestani

Opinion mining refers to the use of natural language processing, text analysis and computational linguistics to identify and extract subjective information in textual material. Opinion mining, also known as sentiment analysis, has received a lot of attention in recent times, as it provides a number of tools to analyse the public opinion on a number of different topics. Comparative opinion mining is a subfield of opinion mining that deals with identifying and extracting information that is expressed in a comparative form (e.g.~"paper X is better than the Y"). Comparative opinion mining plays a very important role when ones tries to evaluate something, as it provides a reference point for the comparison. This paper provides a review of the area of comparative opinion mining. It is the first review that cover specifically this topic as all previous reviews dealt mostly with general opinion mining. This survey covers comparative opinion mining from two different angles. One from perspective of techniques and the other from perspective of comparative opinion elements. It also incorporates preprocessing tools as well as dataset that were used by the past researchers that can be useful to the future researchers in the field of comparative opinion mining.

* Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 68(4), 2017 

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Diagnostic Prediction Using Discomfort Drawings with IBTM

Sep 13, 2016
Cheng Zhang, Hedvig Kjellstrom, Carl Henrik Ek, Bo C. Bertilson

In this paper, we explore the possibility to apply machine learning to make diagnostic predictions using discomfort drawings. A discomfort drawing is an intuitive way for patients to express discomfort and pain related symptoms. These drawings have proven to be an effective method to collect patient data and make diagnostic decisions in real-life practice. A dataset from real-world patient cases is collected for which medical experts provide diagnostic labels. Next, we use a factorized multimodal topic model, Inter-Battery Topic Model (IBTM), to train a system that can make diagnostic predictions given an unseen discomfort drawing. The number of output diagnostic labels is determined by using mean-shift clustering on the discomfort drawing. Experimental results show reasonable predictions of diagnostic labels given an unseen discomfort drawing. Additionally, we generate synthetic discomfort drawings with IBTM given a diagnostic label, which results in typical cases of symptoms. The positive result indicates a significant potential of machine learning to be used for parts of the pain diagnostic process and to be a decision support system for physicians and other health care personnel.

* Presented at 2016 Machine Learning and Healthcare Conference (MLHC 2016), Los Angeles, CA 

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Real-Time Classification of Twitter Trends

Mar 06, 2014
Arkaitz Zubiaga, Damiano Spina, Raquel Martínez, Víctor Fresno

Social media users give rise to social trends as they share about common interests, which can be triggered by different reasons. In this work, we explore the types of triggers that spark trends on Twitter, introducing a typology with following four types: 'news', 'ongoing events', 'memes', and 'commemoratives'. While previous research has analyzed trending topics in a long term, we look at the earliest tweets that produce a trend, with the aim of categorizing trends early on. This would allow to provide a filtered subset of trends to end users. We analyze and experiment with a set of straightforward language-independent features based on the social spread of trends to categorize them into the introduced typology. Our method provides an efficient way to accurately categorize trending topics without need of external data, enabling news organizations to discover breaking news in real-time, or to quickly identify viral memes that might enrich marketing decisions, among others. The analysis of social features also reveals patterns associated with each type of trend, such as tweets about ongoing events being shorter as many were likely sent from mobile devices, or memes having more retweets originating from a few trend-setters.

* Pre-print of article accepted for publication in Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology copyright @ 2013 (American Society for Information Science and Technology) 

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Learning to Rank from Relevance Judgments Distributions

Feb 13, 2022
Alberto Purpura, Gianmaria Silvello, Gian Antonio Susto

Learning to Rank (LETOR) algorithms are usually trained on annotated corpora where a single relevance label is assigned to each available document-topic pair. Within the Cranfield framework, relevance labels result from merging either multiple expertly curated or crowdsourced human assessments. In this paper, we explore how to train LETOR models with relevance judgments distributions (either real or synthetically generated) assigned to document-topic pairs instead of single-valued relevance labels. We propose five new probabilistic loss functions to deal with the higher expressive power provided by relevance judgments distributions and show how they can be applied both to neural and GBM architectures. Moreover, we show how training a LETOR model on a sampled version of the relevance judgments from certain probability distributions can improve its performance when relying either on traditional or probabilistic loss functions. Finally, we validate our hypothesis on real-world crowdsourced relevance judgments distributions. Overall, we observe that relying on relevance judgments distributions to train different LETOR models can boost their performance and even outperform strong baselines such as LambdaMART on several test collections.


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Demographic Fairness in Biometric Systems: What do the Experts say?

May 31, 2021
Christian Rathgeb, Pawel Drozdowski, Naser Damer, Dinusha C. Frings, Christoph Busch

Algorithmic decision systems have frequently been labelled as "biased", "racist", "sexist", or "unfair" by numerous media outlets, organisations, and researchers. There is an ongoing debate about whether such assessments are justified and whether citizens and policymakers should be concerned. These and other related matters have recently become a hot topic in the context of biometric technologies, which are ubiquitous in personal, commercial, and governmental applications. Biometrics represent an essential component of many surveillance, access control, and operational identity management systems, thus directly or indirectly affecting billions of people all around the world. Recently, the European Association for Biometrics organised an event series with "demographic fairness in biometric systems" as an overarching theme. The events featured presentations by international experts from academic, industry, and governmental organisations and facilitated interactions and discussions between the experts and the audience. Further consultation of experts was undertaken by means of a questionnaire. This work summarises opinions of experts and findings of said events on the topic of demographic fairness in biometric systems including several important aspects such as the developments of evaluation metrics and standards as well as related issues, e.g. the need for transparency and explainability in biometric systems or legal and ethical issues.


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Keyphrase Generation with Cross-Document Attention

Apr 21, 2020
Shizhe Diao, Yan Song, Tong Zhang

Keyphrase generation aims to produce a set of phrases summarizing the essentials of a given document. Conventional methods normally apply an encoder-decoder architecture to generate the output keyphrases for an input document, where they are designed to focus on each current document so they inevitably omit crucial corpus-level information carried by other similar documents, i.e., the cross-document dependency and latent topics. In this paper, we propose CDKGen, a Transformer-based keyphrase generator, which expands the Transformer to global attention with cross-document attention networks to incorporate available documents as references so as to generate better keyphrases with the guidance of topic information. On top of the proposed Transformer + cross-document attention architecture, we also adopt a copy mechanism to enhance our model via selecting appropriate words from documents to deal with out-of-vocabulary words in keyphrases. Experiment results on five benchmark datasets illustrate the validity and effectiveness of our model, which achieves the state-of-the-art performance on all datasets. Further analyses confirm that the proposed model is able to generate keyphrases consistent with references while keeping sufficient diversity. The code of CDKGen is available at https://github.com/SVAIGBA/CDKGen.

* 13 pages, 3 figures 

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Self-Attentive Document Interaction Networks for Permutation Equivariant Ranking

Oct 23, 2019
Rama Kumar Pasumarthi, Xuanhui Wang, Michael Bendersky, Marc Najork

How to leverage cross-document interactions to improve ranking performance is an important topic in information retrieval (IR) research. However, this topic has not been well-studied in the learning-to-rank setting and most of the existing work still treats each document independently while scoring. The recent development of deep learning shows strength in modeling complex relationships across sequences and sets. It thus motivates us to study how to leverage cross-document interactions for learning-to-rank in the deep learning framework. In this paper, we formally define the permutation-equivariance requirement for a scoring function that captures cross-document interactions. We then propose a self-attention based document interaction network and show that it satisfies the permutation-equivariant requirement, and can generate scores for document sets of varying sizes. Our proposed methods can automatically learn to capture document interactions without any auxiliary information, and can scale across large document sets. We conduct experiments on three ranking datasets: the benchmark Web30k, a Gmail search, and a Google Drive Quick Access dataset. Experimental results show that our proposed methods are both more effective and efficient than baselines.

* 8 pages 

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Recent Developments in Aerial Robotics: A Survey and Prototypes Overview

Nov 30, 2017
Chun Fui Liew, Danielle DeLatte, Naoya Takeishi, Takehisa Yairi

In recent years, research and development in aerial robotics (i.e., unmanned aerial vehicles, UAVs) has been growing at an unprecedented speed, and there is a need to summarize the background, latest developments, and trends of UAV research. Along with a general overview on the definition, types, categories, and topics of UAV, this work describes a systematic way to identify 1,318 high-quality UAV papers from more than thirty thousand that have been appeared in the top journals and conferences. On top of that, we provide a bird's-eye view of UAV research since 2001 by summarizing various statistical information, such as the year, type, and topic distribution of the UAV papers. We make our survey list public and believe that the list can not only help researchers identify, study, and compare their work, but is also useful for understanding research trends in the field. From our survey results, we find there are many types of UAV, and to the best of our knowledge, no literature has attempted to summarize all types in one place. With our survey list, we explain the types within our survey and outline the recent progress of each. We believe this summary can enhance readers' understanding on the UAVs and inspire researchers to propose new methods and new applications.

* 14 pages, 16 figures, typos corrected 

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Towards Bayesian Deep Learning: A Framework and Some Existing Methods

Sep 03, 2016
Hao Wang, Dit-Yan Yeung

While perception tasks such as visual object recognition and text understanding play an important role in human intelligence, the subsequent tasks that involve inference, reasoning and planning require an even higher level of intelligence. The past few years have seen major advances in many perception tasks using deep learning models. For higher-level inference, however, probabilistic graphical models with their Bayesian nature are still more powerful and flexible. To achieve integrated intelligence that involves both perception and inference, it is naturally desirable to tightly integrate deep learning and Bayesian models within a principled probabilistic framework, which we call Bayesian deep learning. In this unified framework, the perception of text or images using deep learning can boost the performance of higher-level inference and in return, the feedback from the inference process is able to enhance the perception of text or images. This paper proposes a general framework for Bayesian deep learning and reviews its recent applications on recommender systems, topic models, and control. In this paper, we also discuss the relationship and differences between Bayesian deep learning and other related topics like Bayesian treatment of neural networks.

* To appear in IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering (TKDE), 2016. This is a slightly shorter version of the survey arXiv:1604.01662 

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Towards Bayesian Deep Learning: A Survey

Apr 07, 2016
Hao Wang, Dit-Yan Yeung

While perception tasks such as visual object recognition and text understanding play an important role in human intelligence, the subsequent tasks that involve inference, reasoning and planning require an even higher level of intelligence. The past few years have seen major advances in many perception tasks using deep learning models. For higher-level inference, however, probabilistic graphical models with their Bayesian nature are still more powerful and flexible. To achieve integrated intelligence that involves both perception and inference, it is naturally desirable to tightly integrate deep learning and Bayesian models within a principled probabilistic framework, which we call Bayesian deep learning. In this unified framework, the perception of text or images using deep learning can boost the performance of higher-level inference and in return, the feedback from the inference process is able to enhance the perception of text or images. This survey provides a general introduction to Bayesian deep learning and reviews its recent applications on recommender systems, topic models, and control. In this survey, we also discuss the relationship and differences between Bayesian deep learning and other related topics like Bayesian treatment of neural networks.


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