Get our free extension to see links to code for papers anywhere online!

Chrome logo Add to Chrome

Firefox logo Add to Firefox


Peer Grading in a Course on Algorithms and Data Structures: Machine Learning Algorithms do not Improve over Simple Baselines

Feb 10, 2016
Mehdi S. M. Sajjadi, Morteza Alamgir, Ulrike von Luxburg



Peer grading is the process of students reviewing each others' work, such as homework submissions, and has lately become a popular mechanism used in massive open online courses (MOOCs). Intrigued by this idea, we used it in a course on algorithms and data structures at the University of Hamburg. Throughout the whole semester, students repeatedly handed in submissions to exercises, which were then evaluated both by teaching assistants and by a peer grading mechanism, yielding a large dataset of teacher and peer grades. We applied different statistical and machine learning methods to aggregate the peer grades in order to come up with accurate final grades for the submissions (supervised and unsupervised, methods based on numeric scores and ordinal rankings). Surprisingly, none of them improves over the baseline of using the mean peer grade as the final grade. We discuss a number of possible explanations for these results and present a thorough analysis of the generated dataset.

* Published at the Third Annual ACM Conference on Learning at Scale [email protected] 


Share this with someone who'll enjoy it:

   Access Paper Source



Share this with someone who'll enjoy it: